Holding – Graham Norton

“Someone had robbed her of her happiness, and now that they had found his body, she knew exactly who to blame.”

31364727

Blurb: “The remote Irish village of Duneen has known little drama; and yet its inhabitants are troubled. Sergeant PJ Collins hasn’t always been this overweight; mother of­ two Brid Riordan hasn’t always been an alcoholic; and elegant Evelyn Ross hasn’t always felt that her life was a total waste. So when human remains are discovered on an old farm, suspected to be that of Tommy Burke – a former­ love of both Brid and Evelyn – the village’s dark past begins to unravel. As the frustrated PJ struggles to solve a genuine case for the first time in his life, he unearths a community’s worth of anger and resentments, secrets and regret.”

I am always unsure when I hear that a celebrity, not from a literature field, announces that they are writing a book; especially when it’s a piece of fiction. I guess it’s just the sceptical side of me thinking that the person in question is more likely to succeed because they have a ready-made audience there. But that could be said of any kind of art.

Holding is set in the remote village of Duneen in Ireland where not much exciting happens. When a body is dug up by builders at an old farm, the residents come to life with questions of who it might be and who did it. Old memories are brought to the surface and tensions start to rise.

As to be expected this is a slow read at times but that reflects the setting; living in a small village myself I know just how uneventful things can be. The sluggish pace does leave room for Norton to sprinkle back story over the pages and help build up a better picture of the residents from policeman PJ Collins to Brid and Evelyn who have quite a bitter history together. The narrative doesn’t stick solely to one character like I originally thought it might which works really well in giving the reader a movie-montage style view of the lives of these people. While the discovered body is the crux of the snowballing plot, the story is about much more than that. It shows the power of secrets and just what happens if we keep them for too long, as well as if we let them slip free.

For more of my reading adventures follow me on Goodreads

For my writing adventures follow me on Twitter

For my videos, check out my Youtube

For bookish photographs follow my instagram: @charlottereadsthings

Coral And Bone – Tiffany Daune

“Every day is filled with impossibility, until you have chosen to see the possible. Once you make the shift to see, life is a less frightening journey.”

0c9ec12d0b025fb4c2dca91a8918250f.jpg

Blurb: “Halen knows the sparks igniting under her fingertips are dangerous. She has spent her entire life trying to quell the tingly feelings that make her destroy things, but now that she is back in Rockaway Beach, where she watched her father drown, the flames have become impossible to tame. Halen is trying to hold on, but when she is thrust into a mysterious new world, the underwater realm of Elosia, she unravels the secrets of her past and can’t help but ignite.”

*This book was sent to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review*

Coral and Bone follows a girl called Halen who moved back to Rockaway Beach a few years after the death of her father. Halen’s mother hopes returning will bring them solace and the strength to move on with their lives, but Halen has started hearing things that no one else can and the ability to produce sparks from her fingers. When a stranger rescues Halen from a swarm of mermaids, she learns more about her life than she never knew possible.

There are many books I read where the characters outweigh the plot and this is one of them. While the plot is fascinating and unravelled in ways I never could’ve predicted, Halen is very much the driving force of this novel. At the start of the books there is an illustration of her which just made the character feel more real in my mind. The actions and choices she made throughout the story felt like ones a real person would make and I found it so incredibly easy to latch onto her along this adventure.

The world and backstories were delivered through dialogue which stopped the book from falling into info-dump territory which happens all too easily in fantasy/folklore based novels. Also I am a complete sucker for the “training trope” so when there were scenes where Halen was learning to control and harness her powers I was practically jumping up and down with excitement.

The only downside is that frankly the mermaids weren’t around often enough. I would have loved to see more of them.

For more of my reading adventures follow me on Goodreads

For my writing adventures follow me on Twitter

For my videos, check out my Youtube

For bookish photographs follow my instagram: @charlottereadsthings

Awful Auntie – David Walliams

“Aunt Alberta is the most awful aunt who ever lived. Would you like to meet her?”

91iJmnemHML.jpg

Blurb: “From larger than life, tiddlywinks obsessed Awful Aunt Alberta to her pet owl, Wagner – this is an adventure with a difference. Aunt Alberta is on a mission to cheat the young Lady Stella Saxby out of her inheritance – Saxby Hall. But with mischievous and irrepressible Soot, the cockney ghost of a chimney sweep, alongside her Stella is determined to fight back… And sometimes a special friend, however different, is all you need to win through.”

The story follows Lady Stella Saxby who wakes up from a coma to find that her wealthy parents are dead and she is left in the care of her horrid Aunt Alberta and an owl called Wagner. As Stella starts to adjust to a world without her parents, she soon learns that maybe everything isn’t how it first seemed and soon plots an escape with the help of her ghost friend Soot.

All I can say is that I finally understand why David Walliams is constantly topping the charts and making himself comfortable there. Awful Auntie is an injection of fun and downright goodness. It reminded me a lot of Roald Dahl’s The Twits and was a fantastic mix of humour and mystery.

The characters are well-fleshed out and the forgetful butler, Gibbon, had me rolling in my seat at times. I just loved how he wandered around completely unaware of the situation going on around him.

If you’re looking to get into David Walliams’ work and unsure of where to start with his incredible catalogue, Awful Auntie is a sure winner.

For more of my reading adventures follow me on Goodreads

For my writing adventures follow me on Twitter

For my videos, check out my Youtube

For bookish photographs follow my instagram: @charlottereadsthings

Wing Jones – Katherine Webber

“But when I’m running, I don’t feel like an idiot. I feel free, like anything is possible. Like I’m not running from something, but for something.”

51MzDUw26WL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Blurb: “With a grandmother from China and another from Ghana, fifteen-year-old Wing Jones is often caught between worlds. But when tragedy strikes, Wing discovers a talent for running she never knew she had. Wing’s speed could bring her family everything it needs. It could also stop Wing getting the one thing she wants.”

Wing Jones was a book that initially didn’t interest me despite the incredibly hype surrounding it and it wasn’t until streams of positive reviews flooded in that I decided to put aside my preconceived notions about YA Contemporaries aside and give it a chance to change my mind.

The story follows a bi-racial teen called Wing Jones who struggles with fitting in, and nobody at her school tries to make it easier for her. When her brother is involved in a car accident leaving many dead, Wing finds herself being blamed for the actions of her brother all while having to deal with the negative coverage in the media. Looking for a way to cope with her feelings, she ends up running only to discover she’s actually very talented at it.

There are elements of magical realism in the form of the lioness and a dragon that seem to accompany Wing throughout this traumatic period of time like a sort of Mary Poppins “I’ll be there until you no longer need me” way. I found this addition to be really interesting.

Despite all the glowing reviews, this book fell flat for me. It didn’t feel like much happened or that the story ever really got going and the ending just left me feeling incredibly underwhelmed, almost as if I’d wasted time reading it. And sadly this is becoming a theme with a lot of the new releases I’ve delved into so far this year.

I will say that I loved how the events of this story led to Wing finding a positive outlook for her to focus on and work out her emotions through, rather than it falling to something easily more negative. It really shows that we may all have some secret hidden talent that we haven’t unlocked yet.

For more of my reading adventures follow me on Goodreads

For my writing adventures follow me on Twitter

For my videos, check out my Youtube

For bookish photographs follow my instagram: @charlottereadsthings