Doing It – Hannah Witton

“I want this book to educate you, I want this book to feel like your friend gossiping with you. I want this book to make you feel normal, comfortable, empowered and in control of your body.”

hannah_witton_doing_it_book_cover

Blurb: “Figuring out how to build and maintain healthy relationships – with your family, friends, romantically and with yourself – is a crucial part of being a teen. It’s not easy though, particularly in a digital age where information and advice are so forthcoming it can be hard to know who or what to believe or trust. Porn is everywhere, sexting is the norm and messages about body image are highly mixed. Hannah combats this by tackling subjects ranging from masturbation and puberty to slut shaming and consent in an accessible, relatable and extremely honest way.”

*This book was sent to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review*

When I first saw the announcement for this book I have to admit I was disheartened. There’s an endless stream of “YouTuber books” dominating the shelves and most of them feel unwarranted when they’re autobiographies from people who are the same age as me. It felt like Hannah was the newest addition to this money train but when she started to explain what her book was going to be about, it couldn’t have been a more perfect fit.

I have been subscribed to Hannah Witton on YouTube for a very long time and one thing I’ve always loved about her content is that she’s honest. Whether it’s her “drunk advice” or – more recently – the “hormone diaries” videos, Hannah is not afraid to bare all (pardon the pun) when talking about situations that are still seen as a taboo in our society. Even though I’m a twenty-three year old woman, I still find myself learning things about sex (mainly from Hannah) that I had never learnt in a classroom. This book is, as Hannah states in the introduction, something the reader should “dip in and out of for advice” rather than read cover to cover, but for the sake of this review, I read every single page.

Doing It covers everything from…well… “doing it” to the difference between healthy and unhealthy relationships, the time she lost her virginity, birth control, puberty and periods, porn and masturbation, the importance of consent and why it’s okay to wait; anything you can think of regarding sex and relationships is most likely in this book. But another thing I really admired about this book is that Hannah leaves it to certain experiences she hasn’t had to other contributors for whom they are a reality. For example, Riley Dennis has written a chapter about what it’s like dating when you’re trans, Amelia Morris has written about being asexual, Riki Poynter talks about what it’s like to have a sexual relationship when you’re deaf.

I was really educated on what is and isn’t true when it comes to the human body and sex (again even at my age) when Hannah would present a myth and then proceed to explain if it was true or not. For example: the hymen breaking during your first time having sex.

Books like this are bittersweet because Doing It is a book I really could have used when I was a teenager. Even though I didn’t lose my virginity until I was twenty. But it’s such a great thing that books like this and This book Is Gay by Juno Dawson exist to help any struggles that teenagers are going through where they may want to avoid talking to a family member.

“Just remember that whatever your gender, or sexuality, you are wonderful and deserve as much as the next person.”

For more of my reading adventures follow me on Goodreads

For my writing adventures follow me on Twitter

For my videos, check out my Youtube

For bookish photographs follow my instagram: @charlottereadsthings

A response | Zoe Sugg: The Vlogger blamed for teenagers reading more…

… is what the headline for the new article  from The Guardian should say.

Like anyone with a social media account, I am very much aware who Zoella is but I have never been a “fan” or watcher of her videos. When her debut Girl Online was announced, I was impressed that she was one of the first vloggers to write a book that was actually a work of fiction and not an autobiography of her life; these feelings quickly changed when I heard that it was ghostwritten, but I’m not writing this to express my thoughts on that.

Over the past few years there have been streams of articles attacking Young Adult fiction. From Variety’s article about the film adaptation of Me Before You (in which the writer disregards the ages of the protagonists and goes on to say “this is another squeaky-clean YA tearjerker built around a princess too good for words, another saintly love story submerged in youthful doom”) to Slate’s article in which the writer says that adults who read teenage fiction should be “embarrassed”, I am getting really really really tired of this “anti-young adult”narrative. zoella

If we put aside the fact the main article is just a very bitter rant  about Zoella herself rather than her books – which are mentioned in a total of  less than 5 sentences – this is yet another attack on young people and what they choose to read.

I am twenty-three years old and I read a decent range of genres and age ranges but I primarily read YA and I am also working on books within this age group that I hope one day will join the shelves. I choose to mainly read Young Adult, quite simply, because I enjoy it. There’s such a fantastic pool of variety – including  important themes -within this category that just isn’t explored outside of it. I adored reading during my school years and was advanced for my age but that didn’t stop me reading whatever I wanted. I was bullied quite a lot for actually wanting to read outside of a classroom and if I’d experienced that and seen articles online saying that one of my favourite authors was the reason so many teenagers were essentially dumb for reading “below their level” it’s highly likely I would have bowed to peer pressure and stopped reading altogether. This narrative is incredibly harmful. 

I worked as a Christmas Temp at Waterstones and in my short time there I saw just how well loved she is when parents would bring her books to the counter and tell me how their daughter has finally started reading because of these books, how their daughter stays up reading them. One time when a girl who came to the counter to buy the 3rd book, she asked if I’d read them and I said I hadn’t, she demanded that I buy them when I finished work. She was so animated when she talked about those books. To blame a single writer for the reason teen literacy is declining is an insult not just to her, to fellow authors and aspiring writers of the category, but to her readers. Who has the right to label something “less” or even “simple” just because it’s popular? These people are the first to include Harry Potter as an alternative in their arguments which is actually 9-12 fiction. Though, no one seemed to attack adults for reading them when they were being released.

Quite simply, rather than looking for a single person to blame (unsurprisingly a vlogger which all seem to be the subject of media-based attacks recently), or rather the reason why this is happening. Try to find ways to encourage young people to read rather than attacking the one person who may have made them pick up a book in the first place.

No matter what your thoughts are on Zoella, she is the voice of a new generation. Much like Harry Potter and Twilight in the past, she is getting people reading.

And frankly, that is more important than anything else.

 

The One With The Damaged Books

It’s no secret that I love books… A lot. I’ve been reading as much as I can ever since I was taught how to do it. Most of my childhood (and in fact my life now) was spent with my nose in a book. However, in my younger years, it seems I didn’t care for my bookish friends as well as I do now.

Proceed with caution!

Charlotte

The One Where I Shamelessly Promote Myself

Hello my wonderful bookish people!

As you may or may not know (depending on whether you check out the links at the end of my posts) I am also a booktuber! I make videos on book hauls, monthly wrap ups, book to movie talks, and most importantly reviews! Some of the reviews are different to ones that I post in this magical place so please feel free to check it out.

To give you a bit of a taste, every month I will post here my wrap up for the month so you lovely lot can see all the books I’ve read during that month which I may not mention on here. It’s like being part of a not so secret club! *hands out honorary badges and cookies*

Bye for now!

Charlotte

All I Know Now – Carrie Fletcher Book Signing

Yesterday I went on an adventure to Birmingham for the signing of Carrie Hope Fletcher’s book “All I Know Now” (click here for my review). I had never been to Birmingham before so I was excited at the prospect of getting to explore a new city. Naturally, I fell into several book stores. Some things never change. I also got to share this experience with my wonderful boyfriend.

The queue to get into the Waterstone’s was so long that it literally stretched around the outside of the building… and it was raining… and I didn’t bring an umbrella…
I love book signings simply for that fact that you are surrounded by people, clutching the same book as you, and they love it just as much as you do. It’s an indescribable feeling – I later discovered that 200 people had attended the signing. There were drinks and cupcakes on arrival along with rows and rows of chairs facing a stage on which Carrie would soon make her appearance.

Carrie walked out to cheers with a massive smile on her face, rocking a beautiful dress and her famous blond curls. The man giving the interview asked important questions such as if Carrie had intended for the All I Know Now blog to become a book, to which she replied that that was the dream but it becoming a reality was a “happy accident.” Author Giovanna Fletcher was given a mention when the interviewer asked if the sister-in-law had helped her with the writing process, and naturally, Carrie only had nice things to say. It was lovely seeing a closed up, clearly nervous Carrie become more relaxed, eliciting jokes which had the audience in fits of laughter. She then read a chapter from her book – “The Disgusting Business of Falling in Love.” As I listened, I was reminded of just how incredible human beings actually are.

She even treated the audience to some music. Donning her acoustic guitar, she belted out a cover of Taylor Swift’s We Are Never Ever Ever Getting Back Together and her original song Boys In Books Are Better.

IMG_20150508_195122

Then questions were opened up to the audience: aspiring theatre performers asked for audition advice, Once Upon A Time fans asked her about the show and her “ships”, which character she’d love to play on the West End now that her dream of playing older Eponine has been fulfilled (Her answers were Elphaba in Wicked and Wednesday Addams in The Addams Family). But the question that had Carrie flailing in her chair the most was “if you could bring one fictional character to life, who would it be and why?” – She never did give an answer.

So on to the actual signing!
My boyfriend and I joined the queue and while we waited, cupcakes were handed out (life doesn’t get much better than that!) Forty minutes later, we were at the front. Greeted with a smile, we handed our books over and had an opportunity to talk to her. I told her that I benefited most from her chapter about accepting yourself as I am a true criminal of the “you have to say that you’re my friend/boyfriend” statement whenever I’m complimented. I also told her that one of the things that kind of led to my boyfriend and I getting together was the fact that we both watch her videos. This made Carrie really excited and she called us “the hopeful couple.”

IMG_20150508_204647 IMG_20150509_104621

For more of my reading adventures, follow my Goodreads

For my writing adventures, follow my Twitter

For bookish photographs follow me on instagram: charlottereadsthings